What is The Jennifer Act?

THE JENNIFER ACT OVERVIEW

What is wrong with our system?

To put it simply, most states do not have modern legislation to deal with the increasing problem of drug and alcohol abuse. Prescription pills are replacing herion, cocaine, crack, meth and other drugs as the dominant form of drug abuse. Pills are easy to get and tremendously powerful. I watched as my daughter Jennifer Reynolds struggled with addiction for many years, from the time she was only a teenager. Naturally, as her mother, I tried everything I could to intervene. I saw her life being washed away by drugs and alcohol. At the time, I lived in Largo, Florida and I used every law in place to try to save her. I filed Marchman Acts and Baker Acts, they only provided a short term (a few days) of sobriety for Jennifer. Anyone who knows addiction, knows that a few days is not enough time to start thinking clearly. Detox is not something you can accomplish in a few days. The physical part of detox maybe, but the mental element needs much more time.

This was the root problem of the laws in Florida – they could not detain my daughter long enough for her find enough mental clarity.

How I intend to change it

I know first-hand how ineffective the laws are in Florida and how out of control the problem has become. I have found that most states have similar problems. As society’s problems evolve, our laws must evolve as well. The gist of The Jennifer Act legislation is as follows:

• Reduced or eliminated filing fees (some areas in Florida charge $400 to file a petition)

• Increased detox time (72 hours is simply not enough time to restart your life)

• Provide sufficient facilities to house the addicted individuals

• Provide secular or faith-based treatment programs

• And overall, build a cohesive plan between our law enforcement, judicial system, legislature that works to save addicts lives

I believe that addicts lives are worth saving. I know my daughter’s life was worth every ounce of effort I put forth. I’m sure you know someone who has a similar problem and you feel they deserve a second chance at life. My goal is to provide the framework to the various states involved so they understand the problem from the inside out and can battle it properly.

Progress

As of early 2012, Indiana passed Concurrent Resolution 7, also known as The Jennifer Act, into legislation! Our hard work is paying off and we will continue to see progress as we move forward.  Thank you to everyone who has supported this legislation.

Florida is still working on a plan that will pass legislation.

 

 

Below is a copy of the original text from The Jennifer Act legislation.

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I am asking for the legislature to review and revise The Marchman Act to include The Jennifer Act.

Due to the recent death of my daughter, Jennifer M. Reynolds (age 29) and repeated attempts to intervene and save her life by following all Florida laws currently in place, (filing of the Marchman Act in Pinellas, Hillsborough and Hardee Counties on behalf of my daughter, Jennifer),  I see the need for reforming this law.

Respectfully, the following revisions I bring before the legislature:

1) There are no secure beds in Pinellas County, of which The Marchman Act requires.

Therefore, I petition the state of Florida and ask for secured beds and facilities for the addicted under the new amendment: The Jennifer Act.

*note:
There are very few Florida state funded facilities currently available for the addicted for detox. Currently, the addicted can walk out of a treatment facility.

2) The enforcement of The Marchman Act changes from county to county within the state of Florida. Therefore, I ask for the new law The Jennifer Act. The purpose is to ensure revision of the law firmly in place in all counties in which it is filed in the state of Florida.

3) The fee for filing a Marchman Act petition at the courthouse is very costly: $400.00

Therefore, I ask for the new law, The Jennifer Act, and that this filing fee be changed and re-adjusted at an affordable rate of the cost of processing the paper work only. Currently the cost varies from county to county, so The Jennifer Act would make the fee the same for every county in Florida.

4) Currently, the Marchman Act “holds” the addicted person for 72 hours for observation and a professional assessment. Therefore, I ask for the length of time extended for proper medical detoxing, and a board certified professional (C.A.P.) evaluation of the addicted person. The length of detox varies based the substance and the individual, but in either case 72 hours is an insufficient amount of time. Note: intake specialist must be board certified.

5) Evaluation and assessment of the patient/ the addicted is critical. Therefore, I ask for the new law, The Jennifer Act, to supervise and oversee county by county all facilities by The Office Of Drug Control, The Capitol, Tallahassee, Florida.

The Jennifer Act would provide a watchdog team. This would hold the patient/addicted until a thorough and proper assessment and evaluation and stabilization of the patient/addicted has been approved by an elected board on staff at The Office of Drug Control. This is a three-fold plan.

a) It brings accountability to the state funded, state run facility

b) It involves another certified addiction professional, a second evaluation and opinion

c) It ensures a treatment plan that does not release the addicted immediately. This extra time required initially, will provide a time of intense residential drug treatment.

6) Incarceration is not drug treatment. Incarcerating the addicted is perpetuating a revolving door of repeating the insanity of addiction. It brings nothing of purpose to an individual and the result is of no lasting value for mankind. I believe in investing in people, regardless of race, creed or gender which can positively alter and change addiction behaviors and habits. It costs thousands of dollars per year to incarcerate the addicted. Therefore, I ask for the new law, The Jennifer Act, for the purpose of  a network of Doctors and Certified Addiction Professionals -staffed by the Dept. of Corrections to evaluate inmates, including drug testing, mental, physical and emotional assessment due to their addiction. After positive assessment has been made of an addict, I ask on behalf of the addicted, they be given 2 alternatives/choices for rehabilitation and drug treatment vs. incarceration:

a) Faith based drug treatment

b) Secular drug treatment

The purpose of  The Jennifer Act is that we as a body in the state of Florida, work together as advocates to better mankind, especially the weak, sick and drug addicted. For twelve years, I have fearlessly fought hard and mightily for drug treatment (through the Florida court system and laws in place, including petitions to many Judges and Magistrates) for my precious daughter, Jennifer. I am a voice for the castaways, the addicted. They are somebody’s daughter, son, mother, father, sister, brother or loved one. Often times, they have children, like my daughter. She has died at age 29 and left behind a precious little son, age seven and a family that loves her deeply. It is for Jennifer, my grandson Trey and others who have no voice and believe no one hears them or cares, that I write The Jennifer Act.

In summary, it has taken too many petitions, phone calls, letters, emails, and visits to get basic drug treatment for Jennifer – which is why I know first hand the struggle to help an addict. Most people do not have the time, knowledge, willpower or resources to accomplish what I have done, which is why I have proposed The Jennifer Act – so that they may have the chance to save their loved one.

I humbly petition the state of Florida for a revision and improvement of The Marchman Act.

~In God we trust. May I be used as a vessel for the intent of helping others.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zT5CEo-T-fc&hl=en_US&fs=1]

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A bill to be entitled THE JENNIFER ACT

An act relating to substance abuse services; providing a short title; amending s. 28.241, F.S.; providing a reduced filing fee for involuntary admissions proceedings under the Marchman Act; providing for distribution of proceeds; amending s. 397.321, F.S.; requiring that the Department of Children and Family Services strive to ensure that there are secure facility beds available to each county in the state in sufficient quantity to meet the normal demand from that county; amending ss. 397.321 and 397.332, F.S.; transferring specified duties and responsibilities for oversight of providers of substance abuse services from the Department of Children and Family Services to the Office of Drug Control; providing for a type two transfer of specified duties from the Department of Children and Family Services to the Office of Drug Control; amending s. 397.6797, F.S.; increasing the time allowed after an emergency admission for an assessment of the need for further treatment; amending ss. 397.6772, 397.6773, and 397.6798, F.S.; conforming provisions to the increase in the period allowed for assessments; amending s. 397.754, F.S.; specifying requirements for initial processing of inmates by the Department of Corrections for substance abuse needs; providing that, to the fullest extent possible, inmates be given the choice between faith-based and non-faith-based substance abuse programs; providing an effective date.Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1.  The act may be cited as “The Jennifer Act.”

Section 2.  Paragraph (a) of subsection (1) of section 28.241, Florida Statutes, is amended to read:

28.241  Filing fees for trial and appellate proceedings.—

(1)(a)1.a.  Except as provided in sub-subparagraph b., sub-subparagraph d., and subparagraph 2., the party instituting any civil action, suit, or proceeding in the circuit court shall pay to the clerk of that court a filing fee of up to $395 in all cases in which there are not more than five defendants and an additional filing fee of up to $2.50 for each defendant in excess of five. Of the first $265 in filing fees, $80 must be remitted by the clerk to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the General Revenue Fund, $180 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the State Courts Revenue Trust Fund, $3.50 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission and used to fund the Florida Clerks of Court Operations Corporation created in s. 28.35, and $1.50 shall be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Administrative Trust Fund within the Department of Financial Services to fund clerk budget reviews conducted by the Department of Financial Services. The next $15 of the filing fee collected shall be deposited in the state courts’ Mediation and Arbitration Trust Fund. One third of any filing fees collected by the clerk of the circuit court in excess of $100 shall be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission.

b.  The party instituting any civil action, suit, or proceeding in the circuit court under chapter 39, chapter 61, chapter 741, chapter 742, chapter 747, chapter 752, or chapter 753 shall pay to the clerk of that court a filing fee of up to $295 in all cases in which there are not more than five defendants and an additional filing fee of up to $2.50 for each defendant in excess of five. Of the first $165 in filing fees, $80 must be remitted by the clerk to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the General Revenue Fund, $80 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the State Courts Revenue Trust Fund, $3.50 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission and used to fund the Florida Clerks of Court Operations Corporation created in s. 28.35, and $1.50 shall be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Administrative Trust Fund within the Department of Financial Services to fund clerk budget reviews conducted by the Department of Financial Services. The next $15 of the filing fee collected shall be deposited in the state courts’ Mediation and Arbitration Trust Fund.

c.  An additional filing fee of $4 shall be paid to the clerk. The clerk shall remit $3.50 to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Court Education Trust Fund and shall remit 50 cents to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission to fund clerk education. An additional filing fee of up to $18 shall be paid by the party seeking each severance that is granted. The clerk may impose an additional filing fee of up to $85 for all proceedings of garnishment, attachment, replevin, and distress. Postal charges incurred by the clerk of the circuit court in making service by certified or registered mail on defendants or other parties shall be paid by the party at whose instance service is made. No additional fees, charges, or costs shall be added to the filing fees imposed under this section, except as authorized in this section or by general law.

d.  The party instituting any civil action, suit, or proceeding in the circuit court under part V of chapter 397 shall pay to the clerk of that court a filing fee of up to $95 in all cases in which there are not more than five defendants and an additional filing fee of up to $2.50 for each defendant in excess of five. The first $90 in filing fees must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the State Courts Revenue Trust Fund, $3.50 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission and used to fund the Florida Clerks of Court Operations Corporation created in s. 28.35, and $1.50 shall be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Administrative Trust Fund within the Department of Financial Services to fund clerk budget reviews conducted by the Department of Financial Services.

2.a.  Notwithstanding the fees prescribed in subparagraph 1., a party instituting a civil action in circuit court relating to real property or mortgage foreclosure shall pay a graduated filing fee based on the value of the claim.

b.  A party shall estimate in writing the amount in controversy of the claim upon filing the action. For purposes of this subparagraph, the value of a mortgage foreclosure action is based upon the principal due on the note secured by the mortgage, plus interest owed on the note and any moneys advanced by the lender for property taxes, insurance, and other advances secured by the mortgage, at the time of filing the foreclosure. The value shall also include the value of any tax certificates related to the property. In stating the value of a mortgage foreclosure claim, a party shall declare in writing the total value of the claim, as well as the individual elements of the value as prescribed in this sub-subparagraph.

c.  In its order providing for the final disposition of the matter, the court shall identify the actual value of the claim. The clerk shall adjust the filing fee if there is a difference between the estimated amount in controversy and the actual value of the claim and collect any additional filing fee owed or provide a refund of excess filing fee paid.

d.  The party shall pay a filing fee of:

(I)  Three hundred and ninety-five dollars in all cases in which the value of the claim is $50,000 or less and in which there are not more than five defendants. The party shall pay an additional filing fee of up to $2.50 for each defendant in excess of five. Of the first $265 in filing fees, $80 must be remitted by the clerk to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the General Revenue Fund, $180 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the State Courts Revenue Trust Fund, $3.50 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission and used to fund the Florida Clerks of Court Operations Corporation created in s. 28.35, and $1.50 shall be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Administrative Trust Fund within the Department of Financial Services to fund clerk budget reviews conducted by the Department of Financial Services. The next $15 of the filing fee collected shall be deposited in the state courts’ Mediation and Arbitration Trust Fund;

(II)  Nine hundred dollars in all cases in which the value of the claim is more than $50,000 but less than $250,000 and in which there are not more than five defendants. The party shall pay an additional filing fee of up to $2.50 for each defendant in excess of five. Of the first $770 in filing fees, $80 must be remitted by the clerk to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the General Revenue Fund, $685 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the State Courts Revenue Trust Fund, $3.50 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission and used to fund the Florida Clerks of Court Operations Corporation described in s. 28.35, and $1.50 shall be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Administrative Trust Fund within the Department of Financial Services to fund clerk budget reviews conducted by the Department of Financial Services. The next $15 of the filing fee collected shall be deposited in the state courts’ Mediation and Arbitration Trust Fund; or

(III)  One thousand nine hundred dollars in all cases in which the value of the claim is $250,000 or more and in which there are not more than five defendants. The party shall pay an additional filing fee of up to $2.50 for each defendant in excess of five. Of the first $1,770 in filing fees, $80 must be remitted by the clerk to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the General Revenue Fund, $1,685 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the State Courts Revenue Trust Fund, $3.50 must be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission to fund the Florida Clerks of Court Operations Corporation created in s. 28.35, and $1.50 shall be remitted to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Administrative Trust Fund within the Department of Financial Services to fund clerk budget reviews conducted by the Department of Financial Services. The next $15 of the filing fee collected shall be deposited in the state courts’ Mediation and Arbitration Trust Fund.

e.  An additional filing fee of $4 shall be paid to the clerk. The clerk shall remit $3.50 to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Court Education Trust Fund and shall remit 50 cents to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Clerks of the Court Trust Fund within the Justice Administrative Commission to fund clerk education. An additional filing fee of up to $18 shall be paid by the party seeking each severance that is granted. The clerk may impose an additional filing fee of up to $85 for all proceedings of garnishment, attachment, replevin, and distress. Postal charges incurred by the clerk of the circuit court in making service by certified or registered mail on defendants or other parties shall be paid by the party at whose instance service is made. No additional fees, charges, or costs shall be added to the filing fees imposed under this section, except as authorized in this section or by general law.

Section 3.  Subsection (20) of section 397.321, Florida Statutes, is amended to read:

397.321  Duties of the department.—The department shall:

(20)  Designate addictions receiving facilities for the purpose of ensuring that only qualified service providers render services within the context of a secure facility setting. The department shall also strive to ensure that there are secure facility beds available to each county in the state in sufficient quantity to meet the normal demand from that county.

Section 4.  Subsections (6), (7), and (8) of section 397.321, Florida Statutes, are transferred, renumbered as subsection (4) of section 397.332, Florida Statutes, and amended to read:

397.332  Office of Drug Control.

(4)(6) The Office of Drug Control shall:

(a) Assume responsibility for licensing and regulating licensable service components delivering substance abuse services on behalf of service providers pursuant to this chapter.

(b)(7) Ensure that each licensed service provider develops a system and procedures for:

1.(a) Clinical assessment.

2.(b) Treatment planning.

3.(c) Referral.

4.(d) Progress reviews.

5.(e) Followup.

(c)(8) Provide for the systematic and comprehensive program evaluation of substance abuse service providers that are state-owned, state-operated, or state-contracted.

Section 5.  All powers, duties, functions, records, personnel, property, pending issues and existing contracts, administrative authority, administrative rules, and unexpended balances of appropriations, allocations, and other funds for the licensing, regulation, and supervision of substance providers specified in s. 397.321(6), (7), and (8), Florida Statutes, prior to their renumbering and transfer by this act are transferred by a type two transfer, as defined in s. 20.06(2), Florida Statutes, from the Department of Children and Family Services to the Office of Drug Control.

Section 6.  Section 397.6797, Florida Statutes, is amended to read:

397.6797  Dispositional alternatives after emergency admission.—Within 5 days 72 hours after an emergency admission to a hospital, or a licensed detoxification or addictions receiving facility, or the individual must be assessed by the attending physician to determine the need for further services. Within 5 days after an emergency admission to a nonresidential component of a licensed service provider, the individual must be assessed by a qualified professional to determine the need for further services. Based upon that assessment, a qualified professional of the hospital, detoxification facility, or addictions receiving facility, or a qualified professional if a less restrictive component was used, must either:

(1)  Release the individual and, where appropriate, refer the individual to other needed services; or

(2)  Retain the individual when:

(a)  The individual has consented to remain voluntarily at the licensed provider; or

(b)  A petition for involuntary assessment or treatment has been initiated, the timely filing of which authorizes the service provider to retain physical custody of the individual pending further order of the court.

Section 7.  Subsection (1) of section 397.6772, Florida Statutes, is amended to read:

397.6772  Protective custody without consent.—

(1)  If a person in circumstances which justify protective custody as described in s. 397.677 fails or refuses to consent to assistance and a law enforcement officer has determined that a hospital or a licensed detoxification or addictions receiving facility is the most appropriate place for the person, the officer may, after giving due consideration to the expressed wishes of the person:

(a)  Take the person to a hospital or to a licensed detoxification or addictions receiving facility against the person’s will but without using unreasonable force; or

(b)  In the case of an adult, detain the person for his or her own protection in any municipal or county jail or other appropriate detention facility.

Such detention is not to be considered an arrest for any purpose, and no entry or other record may be made to indicate that the person has been detained or charged with any crime. The officer in charge of the detention facility must notify the nearest appropriate licensed service provider within the first 8 hours after detention that the person has been detained. It is the duty of the detention facility to arrange, as necessary, for transportation of the person to an appropriate licensed service provider with an available bed. Persons taken into protective custody must be assessed by the attending physician within the 5-day 72-hour period and without unnecessary delay, to determine the need for further services.

Section 8.  Section 397.6773, Florida Statutes, is amended to read:

397.6773  Dispositional alternatives after protective custody.—

(1)  An individual who is in protective custody must be released by a qualified professional when:

(a)  The individual no longer meets the involuntary admission criteria in s. 397.675(1);

(b)  The 5-day 72-hour period has elapsed; or

(c)  The individual has consented to remain voluntarily at the licensed service provider.

(2)  An individual may only be retained in protective custody beyond the 5-day 72-hour period when a petition for involuntary assessment or treatment has been initiated. The timely filing of the petition authorizes the service provider to retain physical custody of the individual pending further order of the court.

Section 9.  Subsection (1) of section 397.6798, Florida Statutes, is amended to read:

397.6798  Alternative involuntary assessment procedure for minors.—

(1)  In addition to protective custody, emergency admission, and involuntary assessment and stabilization, an addictions receiving facility may admit a minor for involuntary assessment and stabilization upon the filing of an application to an addictions receiving facility by the minor’s parent, guardian, or legal custodian. The application must establish the need for involuntary assessment and stabilization based on the criteria for involuntary admission in s. 397.675. Within 5 days 72 hours after involuntary admission of a minor, the minor must be assessed to determine the need for further services. Assessments must be performed by a qualified professional. If, after the 5-day 72-hour period, it is determined by the attending physician that further services are necessary, the minor may be kept for a period of up to 5 days, inclusive of the 5-day 72-hour period.

Section 10.  Subsections (1) and (2) of section 397.754, Florida Statutes, are amended to read:

397.754  Duties and responsibilities of the Department of Corrections.—The Department of Corrections shall:

(1)  To the fullest extent possible provide inmates upon arrival at a department of Corrections reception center for initial processing with an assessment of substance abuse service needs, including drug testing and mental, physical, and emotional assessment by qualified professionals.

(2)  Provide inmates who are admitted to inmate substance abuse services with an individualized treatment plan which is developed on the basis of assessed need for services and which includes measurable goals and specifies the types of services needed to meet those goals. To the fullest extent possible, each inmate must be given the choice of either a faith-based drug program or a non-faith-based program for rehabilitation and drug treatment.

Section 11.  This act shall take effect July 1, 2010.
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At the holidays: For those of us whose children have died

December 8, 2010 by kingblog22 | Edit

For those families, especially parents whose children have died, this is a bittersweet time of year. It is a time of memories and reflection on holidays past. It is also a reminder of those who are are no longer here with us (like our children.) Please don’t be afraid to mention our loved ones who have died at this time of year. I am getting so many heart breaking emails from families who have buried their children and siblings and grand children to drug overdoses. These are people all over the U.S. who are sharing their hearts candidly as they sign my online petition. I am honored that these brave people have the courage to write to me and share their loss and also show their support of The Jennifer Act. They already know about grief, loss and pain and they, like me, don’t want another family to have to endure this heart-ache.

To all of you who are so open and candid with me, may I say “thank-you” from the bottom of my heart. I promise you I am doing everything within my power, to get this bill to pass in Indiana and Florida. My focus and vision is to see The Jennifer Act bill passed in these 2 states and then bring it to the fore front, nationwide. With budget cuts in every state and treatment for addicts not at the top of the legislative agenda, I realize this makes my mission and advocacy seem humanly impossible. But the bible says, “with God, all things are possible”. Many are praying for this bill to pass, so when it does come to pass, let us remember what a great and mighty GOD we serve!

Thank you to all the legislatures who are helping with this very important legislation Please read all the comments on this website’s on-line Petition site.
You can hear from the people first hand, why we need this bill to pass.

Posted in News and updates | Leave a Comment »
Just Added Online Petiton to Support The Jennifer Act

November 28, 2010 by kingblog22 | Edit

I’ve just made it easier to show your support of The Jennifer Act. I’ve added a new page to the website, Sign the Petition! You can find it as a tab on the top of this website.

Also, here is a direct link to the petition site. Click here or http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/the-jennifer-act—involuntary-drug-treatment/

I keep hearing from people asking how they can help. Simply signing this petition will be a tremendous show of support. This petition will be a huge stepping stone in accomplishing the goal of involuntary drug treatment for those addicted. Once I get signatures compiled, they will be mailed to our Indiana and Florida State Senators and Representatives. Thank you for helping.~

Sometimes God gives us the opportunity to use the lessons we’ve learned and the comfort He’s given us during difficult times to help others in special ways. Paul indicated this when he wrote: “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort those who are in any trouble” (2 Cor. 1:3-4).

~Using the lessons learned in my trials to touch the lives of others~

The comfort God has given us
He wants us now to share
With others who are suffering
So they will sense His care. —Sper

God doesn’t comfort us to make us comfortable; He comforts us to make us comforters.
Isaiah 61: Exaltation of the Afflicted

1The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me,
Because the LORD has anointed me
To bring good news to the afflicted;
He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,
To proclaim liberty to captives
And freedom to prisoners;

Posted in News and updates | 2 Comments »
Bill 22- The Jennifer Act- Indiana

November 17, 2010 by kingblog22 | Edit

DIGEST OF INTRODUCED BILL No: 22
Indiana

Drug and alcohol abuse and commitments. Provides procedures for the involuntary commitment of a person due to alcohol or drug abuse. Requires the division of mental health and addiction to maintain and operate or contract for alcohol and drug rehabilitation facilities, including faith based facilities. Requires the law enforcement academy to provide training regarding persons with alcohol or drug addictions, including training for involuntary commitments for alcohol or drug use. Requires the department of correction and county jails to provide alcohol and drug rehabilitation to all offenders with alcohol or drug addictions.
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FLORIDA: DIGEST OF THE JENNIFER ACT
A bill to be entitled- Florida

The Jennifer Act

An act relating to substance abuse services; providing a short title; amending s. 28.241, F.S.; providing a reduced filing fee for involuntary admissions proceedings under the Marchman Act; providing for distribution of proceeds; amending s. 397.321, F.S.; requiring that the Department of Children and Family Services strive to ensure that there are secure facility beds available to each county in the state in sufficient quantity to meet the normal demand from that county; amending ss. 397.321 and 397.332, F.S.; transferring specified duties and responsibilities for oversight of providers of substance abuse services from the Department of Children and Family Services to the Office of Drug Control; providing for a type two transfer of specified duties from the Department of Children and Family Services to the Office of Drug Control; amending s. 397.6797, F.S.; increasing the time allowed after an emergency admission for an assessment of the need for further treatment; amending ss. 397.6772, 397.6773, and 397.6798, F.S.; conforming provisions to the increase in the period allowed for assessments; amending s. 397.754, F.S.; specifying requirements for initial processing of inmates by the Department of Corrections for substance abuse needs; providing that, to the fullest extent possible, inmates be given the choice between faith-based and non-faith-based substance abuse programs; providing an effective date.